Publications

Year: Author:

Aljoša Ošep, Wolfgang Mehner, Paul Voigtlaender, Bastian Leibe
Accepted for IEEE Int. Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA'18), to appear

The most common paradigm for vision-based multi-object tracking is tracking-by-detection, due to the availability of reliable detectors for several important object categories such as cars and pedestrians. However, future mobile systems will need a capability to cope with rich human-made environments, in which obtaining detectors for every possible object category would be infeasible. In this paper, we propose a model-free multi-object tracking approach that uses a category-agnostic image segmentation method to track objects. We present an efficient segmentation mask-based tracker which associates pixel-precise masks reported by the segmentation. Our approach can utilize semantic information whenever it is available for classifying objects at the track level, while retaining the capability to track generic unknown objects in the absence of such information. We demonstrate experimentally that our approach achieves performance comparable to state-of-the-art tracking-by-detection methods for popular object categories such as cars and pedestrians. Additionally, we show that the proposed method can discover and robustly track a large variety of other objects.

» Show BibTeX

@article{Osep18ICRA,
author = {O\v{s}ep, Aljo\v{s}a and Mehner, Wolfgang and Voigtlaender, Paul and Leibe, Bastian},
title = {Track, then Decide: Category-Agnostic Vision-based Multi-Object Tracking},
journal = {ICRA},
year = {2018}
}






Anne Gehre, Isaak Lim, Leif Kobbelt
Computer Graphics Forum (Proc. EUROGRAPHICS 2018)

Feature curves on 3D shapes provide important hints about significant parts of the geometry and reveal their underlying structure. However, when we process real world data, automatically detected feature curves are affected by measurement uncertainty, missing data, and sampling resolution, leading to noisy, fragmented, and incomplete feature curve networks. These artifacts make further processing unreliable. In this paper we analyze the global co-occurrence information in noisy feature curve networks to fill in missing data and suppress weakly supported feature curves. For this we propose an unsupervised approach to find meaningful structure within the incomplete data by detecting multiple occurrences of feature curve configurations (co-occurrence analysis). We cluster and merge these into feature curve templates, which we leverage to identify strongly supported feature curve segments as well as to complete missing data in the feature curve network. In the presence of significant noise, previous approaches had to resort to user input, while our method performs fully automatic feature curve co-completion. Finding feature reoccurrences however, is challenging since naive feature curve comparison fails in this setting due to fragmentation and partial overlaps of curve segments. To tackle this problem we propose a robust method for partial curve matching. This provides us with the means to apply symmetry detection methods to identify co-occurring configurations. Finally, Bayesian model selection enables us to detect and group re-occurrences that describe the data well and with low redundancy.

» Show BibTeX

@inproceedings{gehre2018feature,
title={Feature Curve Co-Completion in Noisy Data},
author={Gehre, Anne and Lim, Isaak and Kobbelt, Leif},
booktitle={Computer Graphics Forum},
volume={37},
number={2},
year={2018},
organization={Wiley Online Library}
}






Marcel Weiler, Dan Koschier, Magnus Brand, Jan Bender
Computer Graphics Forum (Eurographics)

In this paper, we present a novel physically consistent implicit solver for the simulation of highly viscous fluids using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) formalism. Our method is the result of a theoretical and practical in-depth analysis of the most recent implicit SPH solvers for viscous materials. Based on our findings, we developed a list of requirements that are vital to produce a realistic motion of a viscous fluid. These essential requirements include momentum conservation, a physically meaningful behavior under temporal and spatial refinement, the absence of ghost forces induced by spurious viscosities and the ability to reproduce complex physical effects that can be observed in nature. On the basis of several theoretical analyses, quantitative academic comparisons and complex visual experiments we show that none of the recent approaches is able to satisfy all requirements. In contrast, our proposed method meets all demands and therefore produces realistic animations in highly complex scenarios. We demonstrate that our solver outperforms former approaches in terms of physical accuracy and memory consumption while it is comparable in terms of computational performance. In addition to the implicit viscosity solver, we present a method to simulate melting objects. Therefore, we generalize the viscosity model to a spatially varying viscosity field and provide an SPH discretization of the heat equation.

» Show BibTeX

@article{WKBB2018,
author = {Marcel Weiler and Dan Koschier and Magnus Brand and Jan Bender},
title = {A Physically Consistent Implicit Viscosity Solver for SPH Fluids},
year = {2018},
journal = {Computer Graphics Forum (Eurographics)},
volume = {37},
number = {2}
}






Crispin Deul, Tassilo Kugelstadt, Marcel Weiler, Jan Bender
Computer Graphics Forum

In this paper, we present a novel direct solver for the efficient simulation of stiff, inextensible elastic rods within the Position-Based Dynamics (PBD) framework. It is based on the XPBD algorithm, which extends PBD to simulate elastic objects with physically meaningful material parameters. XPBD approximates an implicit Euler integration and solves the system of non-linear equations using a non-linear Gauss-Seidel solver. However, this solver requires many iterations to converge for complex models and if convergence is not reached, the material becomes too soft. In contrast we use Newton iterations in combination with our direct solver to solve the non-linear equations which significantly improves convergence by solving all constraints of an acyclic structure (tree), simultaneously. Our solver only requires a few Newton iterations to achieve high stiffness and inextensibility. We model inextensible rods and trees using rigid segments connected by constraints. Bending and twisting constraints are derived from the well-established Cosserat model. The high performance of our solver is demonstrated in highly realistic simulations of rods consisting of multiple ten-thousand segments. In summary, our method allows the efficient simulation of stiff rods in the Position-Based Dynamics framework with a speedup of two orders of magnitude compared to the original XPBD approach.

» Show BibTeX

@article{DKWB2018,
author = {Crispin Deul and Tassilo Kugelstadt and Marcel Weiler and Jan Bender},
title = {Direct Position-Based Solver for Stiff Rods},
year = {2018},
journal = {Computer Graphics Forum}
}






Liang-Chieh Chen, Alexander Hermans, George Papandreou, Florian Schroff, Peng Wang, Hartwig Adam
Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR'18)

In this work, we tackle the problem of instance segmentation, the task of simultaneously solving object detection and semantic segmentation. Towards this goal, we present a model, called MaskLab, which produces three outputs: box detection, semantic segmentation, and direction prediction. Building on top of the Faster-RCNN object detector, the predicted boxes provide accurate localization of object instances. Within each region of interest, MaskLab performs foreground/background segmentation by combining semantic and direction prediction. Semantic segmentation assists the model in distinguishing between objects of different semantic classes including background, while the direction prediction, estimating each pixel's direction towards its corresponding center, allows separating instances of the same semantic class. Moreover, we explore the effect of incorporating recent successful methods from both segmentation and detection (i.e. atrous convolution and hypercolumn). Our proposed model is evaluated on the COCO instance segmentation benchmark and shows comparable performance with other state-of-art models.

» Show BibTeX

@article{Chen18CVPR,
title = {{MaskLab: Instance Segmentation by Refining Object Detection with Semantic and Direction Features}},
author = {Chen, Liang-Chieh and Hermans, Alexander and Papandreou, George and Schroff, Florian and Wang, Peng and Adam, Hartwig},
journal = {{IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR'18)}},,
year = {2018}
}






Jens Cornelis, Jan Bender, Christoph Gissler, Markus Ihmsen, Matthias Teschner
The Visual Computer

Incompressible SPH (ISPH) is a promising concept for the pressure computation in SPH. It works with large timesteps and the underlying pressure Poisson equation (PPE) can be solved very efficiently. Still, various aspects of current ISPH formulations can be optimized.

This paper discusses issues of the two standard source terms that are typically employed in PPEs, i.e. density invariance (DI) and velocity divergence (VD). We show that the DI source term suffers from significant artificial viscosity, while the VD source term suffers from particle disorder and volume loss.

As a conclusion of these findings, we propose a novel source term handling. A first PPE is solved with the VD source term to compute a divergence-free velocity field with minimized artificial viscosity. To address the resulting volume error and particle disorder, a second PPE is solved to improve the sampling quality. The result of the second PPE is used for a particle shift (PS) only. The divergence-free velocity field - computed from the first PPE - is not changed, but only resampled at the updated particle positions. Thus, the proposed source term handling incorporates velocity divergence and particle shift (VD+PS).

» Show BibTeX

@Article{Cornelis2018,
author = {Cornelis, Jens and Bender, Jan and Gissler, Christoph and Ihmsen, Markus and Teschner, Matthias},
title = {An optimized source term formulation for incompressible SPH},
journal = {The Visual Computer},
year = {2018},
month = {Feb},
issn = {1432-2315},
day = {20},
doi = {10.1007/s00371-018-1488-8},
url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s00371-018-1488-8},
}






Andrea Bönsch, Sina Radke, Heiko Overath, Laura Marie Aschè, Jonathan Wendt, Tom Vierjahn, Ute Habel, Torsten Wolfgang Kuhlen
Proceedings of the IEEE Virtual Reality Conference, 2018

Personal space (PS), the flexible protective zone maintained around oneself, is a key element of everyday social interactions. It, e.g., affects people's interpersonal distance and is thus largely involved when navigating through social environments. However, the PS is regulated dynamically, its size depends on numerous social and personal characteristics and its violation evokes different levels of discomfort and physiological arousal. Thus, gaining more insight into this phenomenon is important.

We contribute to the PS investigations by presenting the results of a controlled experiment in a CAVE, focusing on German males in the age of 18 to 30 years. The PS preferences of 27 participants have been sampled while they were approached by either a single embodied, computer-controlled virtual agent (VA) or by a group of three VAs. In order to investigate the influence of a VA's emotions, we altered their facial expression between angry and happy. Our results indicate that the emotion as well as the number of VAs approaching influence the PS: larger distances are chosen to angry VAs compared to happy ones; single VAs are allowed closer compared to the group. Thus, our study is a foundation for social and behavioral studies investigating PS preferences.

» Show BibTeX

@InProceedings{Boensch2018c,
author = {Andrea B\"{o}nsch and Sina Radke and Heiko Overath and Laura M. Asch\'{e} and Jonathan Wendt and Tom Vierjahn and Ute Habel and Torsten W. Kuhlen},
title = {{Social VR: How Personal Space is Affected by Virtual Agents’ Emotions}},
booktitle = {Proceedings of IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2018},
year = {2018}
}






Patric Schmitz, Julian Romeo Hildebrandt, André Calero Valdez, Leif Kobbelt, Martina Ziefle
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics

In virtual environments, the space that can be explored by real walking is limited by the size of the tracked area. To enable unimpeded walking through large virtual spaces in small real-world surroundings, redirection techniques are used. These unnoticeably manipulate the user’s virtual walking trajectory. It is important to know how strongly such techniques can be applied without the user noticing the manipulation—or getting cybersick. Previously, this was estimated by measuring a detection threshold (DT) in highly-controlled psychophysical studies, which experimentally isolate the effect but do not aim for perceived immersion in the context of VR applications. While these studies suggest that only relatively low degrees of manipulation are tolerable, we claim that, besides establishing detection thresholds, it is important to know when the user’s immersion breaks. We hypothesize that the degree of unnoticed manipulation is significantly different from the detection threshold when the user is immersed in a task. We conducted three studies: a) to devise an experimental paradigm to measure the threshold of limited immersion (TLI), b) to measure the TLI for slowly decreasing and increasing rotation gains, and c) to establish a baseline of cybersickness for our experimental setup. For rotation gains greater than 1.0, we found that immersion breaks quite late after the gain is detectable. However, for gains lesser than 1.0, some users reported a break of immersion even before established detection thresholds were reached. Apparently, the developed metric measures an additional quality of user experience. This article contributes to the development of effective spatial compression methods by utilizing the break of immersion as a benchmark for redirection techniques.





Sebastian Freitag, Benjamin Weyers, Torsten Wolfgang Kuhlen
Proceedings of IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2018

During free exploration of an unknown virtual scene, users often miss important parts, leading to incorrect or incomplete environment knowledge and a potential negative impact on performance in later tasks. This is addressed by wayfinding aids such as compasses, maps, or trails, and automated exploration schemes such as guided tours. However, these approaches either do not actually ensure exploration success or take away control from the user.

Therefore, we present an interactive assistance interface to support exploration that guides users to interesting and unvisited parts of the scene upon request, supplementing their own, free exploration. It is based on an automated analysis of object visibility and viewpoint quality and is therefore applicable to a wide range of scenes without human supervision or manual input. In a user study, we found that the approach improves users' knowledge of the environment, leads to a more complete exploration of the scene, and is also subjectively helpful and easy to use.





Jonathan Wendt, Benjamin Weyers, Andrea Bönsch, Jonas Stienen, Tom Vierjahn, Michael Vorländer, Torsten Wolfgang Kuhlen
IEEE Virtual Humans and Crowds for Immersive Environments (VHCIE), 2018

When interacting and communicating with virtual agents in immersive environments, the agents’ behavior should be believable and authentic. Thereby, one important aspect is a convincing auralizations of their speech. In this work-in progress paper a study design to evaluate the effect of adding directivity to speech sound source on the perceived social presence of a virtual agent is presented. Therefore, we describe the study design and discuss first results of a prestudy as well as consequential improvements of the design.





Daniel Zielasko, Alexander Meißner, Sebastian Freitag, Benjamin Weyers, Torsten Wolfgang Kuhlen
IEEE Virtual Reality Workshop on Everyday Virtual Reality 2018

Various factors influence the degree of cybersickness a user can suffer in an immersive virtual environment, some of which can be controlled without adapting the virtual environment itself. When using HMDs, one example is the size of the field of view. However, the degree to which factors like this can be manipulated without affecting the user negatively in other ways is limited. Another prominent characteristic of cybersickness is that it affects individuals very differently. Therefore, to account for both the possible disruptive nature of alleviating factors and the high interpersonal variance, a promising approach may be to intervene only in cases where users experience discomfort symptoms, and only as much as necessary. Thus, we conducted a first experiment, where the field of view was decreased when people feel uncomfortable, to evaluate the possible positive impact on sickness and negative influence on presence. While we found no significant evidence for any of these possible effects, interesting further results and observations were made.

» Show BibTeX

@InProceedings{zielasko2018,
title={{Dynamic Field of View Reduction Related to Subjective Sickness Measures in an HMD-based Data Analysis Task}},
author={Zielasko, Daniel and Mei{\ss}ner, Alexander and Freitag Sebastian and Weyers, Benjamin and Kuhlen, Torsten W},
booktitle ={Proc. of IEEE Virtual Reality Workshop on Everyday Virtual Reality},
year={2018}
}






Andrea Bönsch
Doctoral Consortium at IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2018

My research focuses on social locomotion of computer-controlled, human-like, virtual agents in virtual reality applications. Two main areas are covered in the literature: a) user-agent-dynamics in, e.g., pedestrian scenarios and b) pure inter-agent-dynamics. However, joint locomotion of a social group consisting of a user and one to several virtual agents has not been investigated yet. I intend to close this gap by contributing an algorithmic model of an agent’s behavior during social locomotion. In addition, I plan to evaluate the effects of the resulting agent’s locomotion patterns on a user’s perceived degree of immersion, comfort, as well as social presence.

» Show BibTeX

@InProceedings{Boensch2018a,
author = {Andrea B\"{o}nsch},
title = {Locomotion with Virtual Agents in the Realm of Social Virtual Reality},
booktitle = {Doctoral Consortium at IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2018},
year = {2018}
}






Andrea Bönsch, Sina Radke, Jonathan Wendt, Tom Vierjahn, Ute Habel, Torsten Wolfgang Kuhlen
IEEE Virtual Humans and Crowds for Immersive Environments (VHCIE), 2018

The concept of personal space is a key element of social interactions. As such, it is a recurring subject of investigations in the context of research on proxemics. Using virtual-reality-based experiments, we contribute to this area by evaluating the direct effects of emotional expressions of an approaching virtual agent on an individual’s behavioral and physiological responses. As a pilot study focusing on the emotion expressed solely by facial expressions gave promising results, we now present a study design to gain more insight.

» Show BibTeX

@InProceedings{Boensch2018b,
author = {Andrea B\"{o}nsch and Sina Radke and Jonathan Wendt and Tom Vierjahn and Ute Habel and Torsten W. Kuhlen},
title = {{Towards Understanding the Influence of a Virtual Agent’s Emotional Expression on Personal Space}},
booktitle = {IEEE Virtual Humans and Crowds for Immersive Environments},
year = {2018}
}






Sevinc Eroglu, Sascha Gebhardt, Patric Schmitz, Dominik Rausch, Torsten Wolfgang Kuhlen
Proceedings of IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2018

Fluid artwork refers to works of art based on the aesthetics of fluid motion, such as smoke photography, ink injection into water, and paper marbling. Inspired by such types of art, we created Fluid Sketching as a novel medium for creating 3D fluid artwork in immersive virtual environments. It allows artists to draw 3D fluid-like sketches and manipulate them via six degrees of freedom input devices. Different sets of brush strokes are available, varying different characteristics of the fluid. Because of fluid's nature, the diffusion of the drawn fluid sketch is animated, and artists have control over altering the fluid properties and stopping the diffusion process whenever they are satisfied with the current result. Furthermore, they can shape the drawn sketch by directly interacting with it, either with their hand or by blowing into the fluid. We rely on particle advection via curl-noise as a fast procedural method for animating the fluid flow.




Julian Romeo Hildebrandt, Patric Schmitz, André Calero Valdez, Leif Kobbelt, Martina Ziefle
Proceedings of HCI International 2018

Cybersickness poses a crucial threat to applications in the domain of Virtual Reality. Yet, its predictors are insufficiently explored when redirection techniques are applied. Those techniques let users explore large virtual spaces by natural walking in a smaller tracked space. This is achieved by unnoticeably manipulating the user’s virtual walking trajectory. Unfortunately, this also makes the application more prone to cause Cybersickness. We conducted a user study with a semi-structured interview to get quantitative and qualitative insights into this domain. Results show that Cybersickness arises, but also eases ten minutes after the exposure. Quantitative results indicate that a tolerance towards Cybersickness might be related to self-efficacy constructs and therefore learnable or trainable, while qualitative results indicate that users’ endurance of Cybersickness is dependent on symptom factors such as intensity and duration, as well as factors of usage context and motivation. The role of Cybersickness in Virtual Reality environments is discussed in terms of the applicability of redirected walking techniques.




Andreas Tillmann

We investigate the NP-hard problem of computing the spark of a matrix (i.e., the smallest number of linearly dependent columns), a key parameter in compressed sensing and sparse signal recovery. To that end, we identify polynomially solvable special cases, gather upper and lower bounding procedures, and propose several exact (mixed-)integer programming models and linear programming heuristics. In particular, we develop a branch-and-cut scheme to determine the girth of a matroid, focussing on the vector matroid case, for which the girth is precisely the spark of the representation matrix. Extensive numerical experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of our specialized algorithms compared to general-purpose black-box solvers applied to several mixed-integer programming models.



Code and test instances available per request; will become directly available on this page in the near future.
» Show BibTeX

@techreport{Tillmann2018,
author = {Andreas M. Tillmann},
title = {{Computing the Spark: Mixed-Integer Programming\\for the (Vector) Matroid Girth Problem}},
institution = {{RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany}},
year = {2018}
}






Tobias Fischer, Ganapati Hegde, Frederic Matter, Marius Pesavento, Marc Pfetsch, Andreas Tillmann
to appear in Proc. WSA (ITG Workshop on Smart Antennas) 2018

In this paper, we consider the problem of joint antenna selection and analog beamformer design in a downlink single-group multicast network. Our objective is to reduce the hardware requirement by minimizing the number of required phase shifters at the transmitter while fulfilling given quality of constraints. We formulate the problem as an L0 minimization problem and devise a novel branch-and-cut based algorithm to solve the formulated mixed-integer nonlinear program optimally. We also propose a suboptimal heuristic algorithm to solve the above problem with a low computational complexity. Furthermore, the performance of the suboptimal method is evaluated against the developed optimal method, which serves as a benchmark.

» Show BibTeX

@inproceedings{FischerHedgeMatterPesaventoPfetschTillmann2018,
author = {T. Fischer and G. Hedge and F. Matter and M. Pesavento and M. E. Pfetsch and A. M. Tillmann},
title = {{Joint Antenna Selection and Phase-Only Beam Using Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Programming}},
booktitle = {{Proc. WSA 2018}},
pages = {},
year = {2018},
note = {to appear}
}






Aljoša Ošep, Paul Voigtlaender, Jonathon Luiten, Stefan Breuers, Bastian Leibe
arXiv:1712.08832

We explore object discovery and detector adaptation based on unlabeled video sequences captured from a mobile platform. We propose a fully automatic approach for object mining from video which builds upon a generic object tracking approach. By applying this method to three large video datasets from autonomous driving and mobile robotics scenarios, we demonstrate its robustness and generality. Based on the object mining results, we propose a novel approach for unsupervised object discovery by appearance-based clustering. We show that this approach successfully discovers interesting objects relevant to driving scenarios. In addition, we perform self-supervised detector adaptation in order to improve detection performance on the KITTI dataset for existing categories. Our approach has direct relevance for enabling large-scale object learning for autonomous driving.

» Show BibTeX

@article{OsepVoigtlaender18arxiv,
title={Large-Scale Object Discovery and Detector Adaptation from Unlabeled Video},
author={Aljo\v{s}a O\v{s}ep and Paul Voigtlaender and Jonathon Luiten and Stefan Breuers and Bastian Leibe},
journal={arXiv preprint arXiv:1712.08832},
year={2018}
}






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